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CONNECTING PEOPLE & PLACE
TO BUILD COMMUNITY


The views and opinions in the WCCDA blog do not necessarily reflect those of The WCCDA or it's staff.

Archive for February, 2011

February 28th, 2011 in Education, Video, Youth | No Comments


Via youtube: A parody of “Teach Me How to Dougie,” by Cali Swag District, made by teachers and staff at Denny International Middle School, in Seattle, WA.

Read about the making of this video here.

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February 25th, 2011 in Community, Education, Employment, Environment, Health, Housing, Partners, People, Politics, Video | No Comments


Via Got Green:

The “Women in the Green Economy” project aims to learn from women and their families in SE Seattle about what they need and want from the green movement. The project will survey low-income women and women of color around four issues: green jobs; green home; access to healthy and fresh foods; and public transportation.

Read more about the project here!

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February 22nd, 2011 in Community, Events, Partners | No Comments


CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE

cambodian-new-year-festival-updated-flyer

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February 22nd, 2011 in Community, Partners, People, Video, Youth | No Comments


It is the last day of filming for Director Zia Mohajerjasbi and crew at Cascade Middle School for Seattle rapper Macklemore’s song “Wings”, and the students are excited to be a part of what will be a great music video. Video gear, crew, students and staff are packed into one classroom this morning, where filming will continue in the hallway and cafeteria this afternoon. We were on the set this morning, and will make sure to post the final product here and on Facebook in the near future.

photo-3

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Above photos and video by White Center CDA staff, to not be used without permission of the CDA.

The song itself is a moving portrait of Macklemore’s love for Air Jordan (Michael Jordan) sneakers, and the consequences that come with it. You can listen to the song here:

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February 17th, 2011 in Environment, Events, People | No Comments


cdasavedatespring2011

More information about this year’s Spring Clean coming soon!

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February 17th, 2011 in Community, Education, Health, Partners, People, Youth | No Comments


In White Center, the YES Foundation, along with Community Schools Collaboration, partnered up with Cascade Bicycle Club in 2009 to create the Major Taylor bike project, an “after-school cycling program for young people aged 11-18 integrating bicycle riding, healthy living, cycle maintenance, road safety awareness, and the importance of working toward individual goals” (link). The project continues to offer opportunities to youth in White Center involving bike riding that they couldn’t find anywhere else.

But who exactly is “Major Taylor”? For Black History Month, we’d like to offer a brief profile of this bicycling great.

major1Marshall Walter “Major” Taylor (26 November 1878 – 21 June 1932) was an American cyclist who won the world 1 mile (1.6 km) track cycling championship in 1899 after setting numerous world records and overcoming racial discrimination. Taylor was the first African-American athlete to achieve the level of world champion and only the second black man to win a world championship—after Canadian boxer George Dixon.

Taylor was the son of Gilbert Taylor, Civil War veteran and Saphronia Kelter, who had migrated from Louisville, Kentucky with their large family to a farm in rural Indiana. He was one of eight children, five girls and three boys. Taylor’s father was employed in the household of a wealthy Indiana family, the Southard’s, as a coachman, where Taylor was also raised and educated. When Taylor was a child, his father would bring him to work. The employer had a son, Dan Southard, who was the same age and the two boys became close friends. Taylor later moved in with the family and was able to live a more advantaged life than his parents could provide.

This period of living and learning at the Southard house lasted from the time he was eight until he was 12 when the Southard’s moved to Chicago and Taylor “was soon thrust into the real world.”

At age 12, Taylor received his first bicycle the Southard’s and became such an expert trick rider that a local bike shop owner, Tom Hay, hired him to stage exhibitions and perform cycling stunts outside his bicycle shop. The name of the shop was Hay and Willits. The compensation was $6 a week, plus a free bike worth $35. Taylor performed the stunts wearing a soldier’s uniform, hence the nickname “Major.”

When he was 13 in 1891, Taylor won his first race, an amateur event in Indianapolis. Two years later, in 1893 at age 15, Taylor beat the 1 mile (1.6 km) amateur track record where he was “hooted” and then barred from the track because of his color.

Although he was greatly celebrated abroad, particularly in France, Taylor’s career was still held back by racism, particularly in the Southern states where he was not permitted to compete against Caucasians. The League of American Wheelmen for a time excluded blacks from membership. Other prominent bicycle racers of the era, such as Tom Cooper and Eddie Bald, often cooperated to insure Taylor’s defeat. During his career he had ice water thrown at him during races and nails scattered in front of his wheels, and was often boxed in by other riders, preventing the sprints to the front of the pack at which he was so successful.

In his autobiography, he reports actually being tackled on the race track by another rider, who choked him into unconsciousness but received only a $50 fine as punishment. Nevertheless, he does not dwell on such events in the book; rather it is evident that he means it to serve as an inspiration to other African-Americans trying to overcome similar treatment. Taylor retired at age 32 in 1910, saying he was tired of the racism. His advice to African-American youths wishing to emulate him was that while bicycle racing was the appropriate route to success for him, he would not recommend it in general; and that individuals must find their own best talent.While Taylor was reported to have earned between $25,000 and $30,000 a week when he returned to Worcester at the end of his career, by the time of his death he had lost everything to bad investments (including self-publishing his autobiography), persistent illness, and the stock market crash. His marriage over, he died at age 53 on June 21, 1932-a pauper in Chicago’s Bronzeville neighborhood, in the charity ward of Cook County Hospital-to be buried in an unmarked grave. He was survived by his daughter.

In 1948 a group of former pro bike racers, with money donated by Schwinn Bicycle Co. (then) owner Frank W. Schwinn, organized the exhumation and relocation of Taylor’s remains to a more prominent part of Mount Glenwood Cemetery in Glenwood, Illinois, near Chicago. A monument to his memory stands in Worcester, and Indianapolis named the city’s bicycle trapock after Taylor.

Information via Wikipedia

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February 17th, 2011 in Community, People, Politics, Video | No Comments


Via Western States Center:

To celebrate Black History Month we are happy to share with you a couple short video clips of Loretta Ross, cofounder and national coordinator of SisterSong, Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. 

Watch this video to find out the origin of “women of color.”

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February 17th, 2011 in Community, Housing, Partners, Video | No Comments


sopicamblog

The Strength of Place Village (SOPV) project is well underway at the corner of SW 100th Street and 13th Avenue SW in White Center and we are excited to announce that you can all view its progress via our new site construction camera (link below), courtesy of Absher Construction Company.

There are many features to the camera, including a live image, archived images by calendar day/month, and the ability to print and save photos/videos. The time lapse option allows users to see all the live images taken all at once, so we will post updated time lapse photos every two months. The photos are updated every 13-15 minutes.

SOPV’s projected construction completion is September, 2011.

http://oxblue.com/pro/open/absherconstruction/strengthofplace

We are currently about 25% complete and are about to begin the framing on all three buildings. This spring, as we are closer to 50% construction completion, we will be organizing various events for the community here including a site walkthrough and a pre-leasing intake meeting for future residents. We are also currently accepting applications for construction workers and a Resident Manager for the property. For more information on these positions, please contact Patty Julio at the White Center CDA at (206) 694-1082 or via e-mail at patricia@wccda.org.

For more information on the Strength of Place Village project, please see these previous White Center CDA blog entries:

http://www.wccda.org/home/wccda/909
http://www.wccda.org/home/wccda/1018

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February 10th, 2011 in Community, Education, News, Partners, People, Politics, Youth | No Comments


The educational Levy’s voting results  from this week’s special election are out, with 31% of voters reporting to the polls. Our partners at the Highline School District tell us how happy they are with the results.

“We are grateful to Highline voters for their remarkable show of support for their local schools,” says Catherine Carbone Rogers, Highline Public Schools director of Communication and Community Development. “The election results show that this community really values education and wants to invest in our children and schools.”

Below are the results as of February 9:

HIGHLINE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 401

Ballots Cast Registered Voters
17892 56549


31.64% voters reported

Proposition No. 1 Replacement of Expiring Educational Programs and Operation Levy

YES NO
10855 (60.72%) 7022 (39.28%)


Source: King County Elections

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February 8th, 2011 in Employment, Partners, Youth | No Comments


We’ve posted a new job opportunity in our Classifieds section!

CLICK HERE FOR THE DIRECT LINK

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